In A Standard Template File How Often Does The WordPress Loop Run? (Perfect answer)

You’ll find the WordPress Loop in every template file in your theme. In this post, we’ll examine the WordPress Loop in the current default theme, twenty sixteen. If you don’t already have access to that theme, download it and open it up in your favourite code editor.

Contents

How does the WordPress loop run?

The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post.

How many loops are available in template theme?

Collectively, these four techniques enable simple loops, multiple loops, and custom loops in your WordPress theme template. A good place to find a default loop, for example, is in your theme’s index. php file. Its purpose is to loop through the posts stored in the database and echo their contents to the browser.

What is the loop WordPress?

The loop, or WordPress loop or simply loop, is PHP code that displays WordPress posts. The loop is used in WordPress themes to display a list of posts in a web page. There are several Template tags that work only inside the WordPress loop and can be used to format, arrange, and publish post data.

What is the default template WordPress?

Example: header. php is a default template used in most WordPress themes. It defines the header area of web pages generated by WordPress. The header file will typically be loaded on every page of your WordPress site, allowing changes to be made to a single file, that will apply across the entire website.

Which looping process is a post loop?

In an exit controlled loop, a condition is checked after executing the body of a loop. It is also called as a post-checking loop. The control conditions must be well defined and specified otherwise the loop will execute an infinite number of times.

What are template tags in WordPress?

A template tag is a PHP function used to generate and display information dynamically. WordPress Themes contain different templates and theme developers use template tags to fetch and display dynamic data. WordPress has many built-in template tags that can be used in WordPress themes.

When should you edit core WordPress files?

You should never edit the core wordpress files because in the next version of wordpress when you updated you will lose your changes. If you your changes is temporary then you can make it but make sure that your changes will not conflict with any other files.

In what case might there be no posts to display in the loop?

In what case might there be no posts to display in The Loop? No posts have been assigned to the category on a Category Archive. No posts have been assigned to the tag on a Tag Archive. No posts are found for a user search on the search results page.

What is loop and how it works?

In computer programming, a loop is a sequence of instructions that is repeated until a certain condition is reached. An operation is done, such as getting an item of data and changing it, and then some condition is checked such as whether a counter has reached a prescribed number.

How do I optimize my WordPress site?

10 Ways to Optimize Your WordPress Website for Speed

  1. Choose a Quality Hosting Plan.
  2. Always Keep Your Plugins, Themes, and WordPress Software Updated.
  3. Implement Caching to Reduce the Number of Requests Your Site Handles.
  4. Use Image Optimization to Make Your Media Files Smaller.
  5. Minify and Compress Your Website’s Files.

How do I get all my posts on WordPress?

You have to use post_per_page=’-1′ to retrive all the posts. $args = array( ‘post_type’=> ‘post’, ‘orderby’ => ‘ID’, ‘post_status’ => ‘publish’, ‘order’ => ‘DESC’, ‘posts_per_page’ => -1 // this will retrive all the post that is published ); $result = new WP_Query( $args ); if ( $result-> have_posts() ):?>

What is the configuration file in WordPress?

wp-config. php is one of the core WordPress files. It contains information about the database, including the name, host (typically localhost), username, and password. This information allows WordPress to communicate with the database to store and retrieve data (e.g. Posts, Users, Settings, etc).

How will you set the template as default template?

On the Contents tab in the details pane, click the Templates tab to display available templates. Right-click the template that you want to set as the default, and then click Set as Default. Click Yes to confirm. When the Progress window indicates that overall progress is complete, click Close.

How do I set a default template in WordPress?

Changing a Page Template

  1. Go to Dashboard > Pages > All Pages.
  2. Go to one of the existing pages that you want to modify and select Quick Edit.
  3. Go to the Templates options (1), choose one of the available templates and click on Update(2). Once it’s done, click on the Apply button (3).

Where is the default template file in WordPress?

On your WordPress Dashboard, choose Appearance→Editor to look at the template files within a theme. The Edit Themes page appears and lists the various templates available within the active theme.

The Loop

The Loop is the basic technique that WordPress employs for generating posts from template files included within a theme. The number of posts that are retrieved is governed by the number of posts that are displayed on each page, which is chosen in the Reading options. The Loop is used by WordPress to get each post that is to be displayed on the current page and format it in accordance with the theme’s formatting instructions. Loop is responsible for extracting the data for each post from the WordPress database and inserting it into eachtemplate tag’s proper placeholder information.

Simply put, the Loop does exactly what it says on the tin: it loops over each post fetched for the current page one at a time and executes the action defined in your theme.

  • The content and comments on a single post are displayed on the blog’s homepage
  • The content and comments on an individual page are displayed using template tags
  • The content of a single post is displayed on the blog’s homepage is displayed using template tags
  • As well as displaying data from Custom Post Types and Custom Fields

To show and edit different types of material within your template files, you may customize the Loop across them.

The Loop in DetailThe Loop in Detail

The basic loop is as follows:?phpif (have posts()):while (have posts()):the post();/ Display post content endwhile;endif;?phpif (have posts()):while (have posts()):the post();/ Display post content endwhile;endif;?phpif (have posts()):while (have posts()):the post();/ Display post This loop specifies that whenever there are new posts, the loop should be executed and the new posts shown. The following is a more in-depth breakdown:

  • The method have posts() determines whether or not there are any posts. The whileloop continues to run as long as the condition in the parenthesis is logically true, regardless of whether or not there are any postings. The loop will continue as long as have posts() remains true
  • Otherwise, it will terminate.

Using The LoopUsing The Loop

The Loop should be included in index.php as well as any other templates that are used to display information about new blog posts. Because you don’t want to have to repeat the process of getting your header over and again, the loop should always be put after the call toget header (). As an illustration: ?phpget header(); if (have posts()):while (have posts()):the post();/ Display post content endwhile;endif;?phpget header(); if (have posts()):while (have posts()):the post();/ Display post content endwhile;endif;?phpget header(); if (have posts()):while (have In the above example, the end of the Loop is indicated by the use of anendwhileandendif.

Between the starting and closing statements, any template tags that you desire to apply to all posts must be included.

When using endwhile and endif statements, the message must be inserted between the two statements, as seen in the following examples: The following is an example of a very simple index.php file: ?php If (have posts()) is true, while (have posts() is true): the post(); the content(); endwhile; if (have posts() is false, _e(‘Sorry, no posts met your criteria.’, ‘textdomain’); endif; get sidebar(); get footer();?

get sidebar(); get footer();? Obtain the whole source code Full source code should be collapsed. a b c d

What the Loop Can DisplayWhat the Loop Can Display

The Loop may display a variety of different components depending on the post being displayed. For example, some commontemplate tags that can be found in various themes are as follows:

  • A link to a post that was published chronologically after the current post
  • A connection to a post that was published chronologically before the current post
  • And a link to the post that was published chronologically before the current post the category() returns the category or categories that are connected with the post or page that is now being viewed
  • The author() returns the author of a post or page
  • The content() returns the primary content of a post or page
  • And the content() returns the author of a post or page. excerpt() – the first 55 words of a post’s main content, followed by an ellipsis (.) or read more link that takes the reader to the full post – is defined as follows: The “Excerpt” field of a post may also be customized in order to adjust the length of a specific excerpt
  • The ID for the post or page
  • The meta for the post or page
  • The shortlink to this post using the url of the site and the ID of the post or page
  • The title of this post or page
  • The date and time this post or page was created
  • The tags associated with this post or page
  • The meta() for this post or page
  • The shortlink to this post using the url of this site and the ID of the post or page Using the usual PHP date function formatting, this may be changed to suit your needs.

You can also useconditional tags, such as:

  • Is home() returns true if the current page is the homepage
  • Otherwise, it returns false. is admin() – Returns true if the user is currently in the Administration Screen, and false otherwise if the user is not. When a single post is presently displayed on the page, is single() returns true
  • Otherwise, it returns false. It returns true if the page is now showing only a single page. is page() returns true if the page is presently showing only one page. is page template()– This function can be used to determine whether or not a page is using a specific template, for example, the following: is page template(‘about-page.php’)
  • It returns true if the page or post belongs to the provided category, for example: is category(). is category(‘news’)
  • Is tag() – Returns true if a page or post has the supplied tag
  • Otherwise, returns false. is author()– Returns true if the user is currently on the author’s archive page. is search() – This function returns true if the current page is a search results page
  • Otherwise, it returns false. is 404() – Returns true if the current page does not exist
  • Otherwise, returns false. has excerpt() – This function returns true if a post or page has an excerpt.

ExamplesExamples

Examine the following examples of how the Loop is put into action: a b c d

Basic ExamplesBasic Examples

Most blogs offer a blog archive page, which can display a variety of information, including the title of the post, a thumbnail image, and an excerpt. The following example illustrates a straightforward loop that checks to see if there are any new postings and, if there are, produces the titles, thumbnails, and excerpts for each one. If no posts have been made, the message is displayed in parenthesis. ?php If (have posts()) is true: while (have posts()): the post();the title(‘ h2 ‘,’/h2 ‘);the post thumbnail();the excerpt(); endwhile; while (have posts()): the post();the title(‘ h2 ‘,’/h2 ‘);the post thumbnail();the excerpt(); endwhile else: If _e(‘Sorry, no postings met your criteria.’, ‘textdomain’);endif; is used, what is it?

Individual PostIndividual Post

Each post in WordPress has its own page, which contains all of the pertinent information for that particular post. Template tags enable you to choose which information should be displayed and which should not. The title and content of the post are output by the loop in the following example. This example might be used in a post or page template file to display the bare minimum of information about the post or page. You might also modify this template in order to include more information in the article, such as the category.

a b c d

Intermediate ExamplesIntermediate Examples

The following example accomplishes a number of objectives:

  • It first displays each post with its title, date/time stamp, author, content, and category, in a manner similar to the individual post example above
  • Second, it displays the total number of posts in a given category
  • And third, it displays the total number of posts in a given category. Using the in category()template tag, it then makes it possible for posts with category ID “3” to be formatted in a different way, which is useful for SEO purposes.
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The code comments in this example offer information about each iteration of the loop, including: ?php /?html /?php / Start the loop by pressing the Start button. If (have posts()) is true: * Check to see whether the current post is in category 3 using the while (have posts()): the post(); The CSS class “post-category-three” is applied to the div if this is the case. If this is not the case, the div is given the CSS class “post.” */ If (in category(3)) is true, then ?div class=”post-category-three”>?div class=”post-category-three”> ?php alternatively:?div class=”post”?php endif;/ This displays the title of the post.

printf( (‘Posted by percent s’, ‘textdomain’), get the author posts link());/ Display the content of the post in a div.

?div class=”entry”?php?div class=”entry” the content()?/div?php / the content()?/div?php Display a comma-separated list of the categories associated with the post.

If there aren’t any, this “otherwise” section explains what to do. This will completely terminate the Loop. */ _e(‘Sorry, no posts met your search criteria.’, ‘textdomain’);/ Terminate the Loop completely. if; if not;? Obtain the whole source code Full source code should be collapsed. a b c d

Multiple LoopsMultiple Loops

It is possible that you will need to employ more than one loop in some scenarios. For example, you could wish to display the names of the articles in a table of content list at the top of the page, followed by the substance of the posts lower down the page on the same page. Because the query isn’t changing, we just need to rewind the loop when we need to cycle through the articles for a second time to complete the process. This will be accomplished through the usage of the functionrewind posts ().

Using rewind_postsUsing rewind_posts

You may use the function ewind posts() to run over the same query a second time if necessary. The following is handy if you wish to display the same query again on the same page, but in separate positions. Here’s an example of how to put rewind posts() to use: ?php / Begin the main loop if (have posts()):while (have posts()): the post(); the title(); endwhile; endif; while (have posts()): the post(); the title(); / Rewind the posts using the rewind posts() function to use the query a second time.

a b c d

Creating secondary queries and loopsCreating secondary queries and loops

Making two loops with the same question was rather simple, but it wasn’t really the best solution. You will most likely want to develop a secondary query to display alternative material on the template rather than a primary query. Example: You could wish to display two groups of postings on the same page, with each group receiving a unique treatment that differs from the other. As illustrated in the example below, showing a single post with a list of posts from the same category beneath the single post is a popular use of this technique.

  • (have posts()):while (have posts()): the post(); the title(); the content(); endwhile; otherwise: if (have posts()): while (have posts()): the post(); the title(); the content(); endwhile; / If no posts are discovered, this text will be shown.
  • Please keep in mind that you can use any category name in this field.
  • / This is the second loop.
  • As you can see in the above example, we begin by displaying a standard loop.

It is important to note that the normal loop in the above example differs in that it callswp reset postdata() to reset the post data. The post data must be reset before you can utilize a second loop in the program. There are two options for accomplishing this:

  1. The therewind posts() function, or the creation of new query objects, are two options.

Resetting multiple loopsResetting multiple loops

When working with several loops in a template, it’s critical to remember to reset them. Because of the way data is saved and utilized within theglobal$postvariable, failing to do so might result in unexpected consequences. Depending on how they are invoked, there are three primary methods of resetting the loop.

Using wp_reset_postdataUsing wp_reset_postdata

When you are using WP Query to perform custom or multiple loops, you should use thewp reset postdata() function. This method returns the global$postvariable to the position it was in before the main query was executed. As long as you adhere to established practices, this will be the most often encountered function when attempting to reset loops. To make good use of this method, you must include the following code after any loops that contain WP Query:?php wp reset postdata();? Here is an example of a loop that makes use of WP Query and is reset with the wp reset postdata() function:?php/ An example of an argument that defines three posts per page is shown below.

$the query = new WP Query($args);if ($the query- have posts()): $the query = new WP Query($args); The following functions are called when the Loopwhile variable is set to true: $the query- have posts(); $the query- the post(); the title($the query- have posts());/ End the Loopendwhile;else: / If there are no posts that match this query, display this text.

Obtain the whole source code Full source code should be collapsed.

Using wp_reset_queryUsing wp_reset_query

Using the wp reset query() function, you may return the WP Query and global$postdata to their original positions in the main query. It is required that you utilize this function to restart your loop if you are using query posts() within your loop code. WP Query may be used after custom loops with WP Query since it really executes the function wp reset postdata() when it is executed. However, it is recommended that you usewp reset postdata() when creating custom loops that include WP Query. Using the function alert:query posts() is not recommended and should be avoided at all costs.

In order to make effective use of this method, the following code should be placed after any loops that contain query posts ().

Understanding The Loop: WordPress’s Way of Showing Posts

WordPress loop, or more generally known as “the loop,” is one of the most significant subjects in WordPress development, and this post will introduce you to it. If you’re interested in learning more about some of the fundamental ideas of creating WordPress themes, have a look at our free course on getting started with WordPress themes. This material is excellent since it is not one of our standard articles: it is instead: A sample chapter from our “learn WordPress development” guideUp and Running, which is now in its revamped and extended 3rd Edition and has more than 100 new pages.

If you like this chapter, you should read Up and Running. There are perhaps 40 more chapters in the same vein as this one. It is the most comprehensive guide on WordPress development available.

The Best Way to Learn WordPress Development

Everything is up and running. is a comprehensive “learn WordPress development” course that includes everything. It has helped hundreds of satisfied customers learn WordPress programming the fast, smart, and comprehensive way, and it is now in its third edition, which has been updated and expanded. Here’s what one of them had to say about the situation: “This course, in my opinion, is a must-have for anyone interested in learning WordPress programming. It felt like a slew of lights were turned on as I was watching the films.” WP developer Jason has contributed to this article.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Loop is a critically essential topic in WordPress theme creation since it is how the theme is constructed. WordPress generates an HTML webpage from a collection of posts that have been retrieved from the database
  • The Loop is a PHPwhile -loop that runs once for each fetched post. The Loop is a WordPress template hierarchy that allows theme authors to define repeating rules for how each post should show, mostly through the use of WordPress’ template tags. The Loop should be included in every theme file that is part of the WordPress template hierarchy. When it comes to creating multiple views and layouts for webpages that display various types of posts (for example, Posts and Pages), customizing this Loop is a crucial component of theme development.

It is how the loop works that is so vital in WordPress theme development: it is how the theme works. This PHPwhile-loop is used to transform a bundle of posts that have been retrieved from the database into an HTML webpage; each fetched post is executed once by WordPress. The Loop is found in every theme file that is a component of the WordPress template hierarchy, and it allows theme creators to define repeating rules for how each post should show, mostly through the use of WordPress’s template tags.

The Loop in Plain English

There will be no programming in this area. We’ll only go through the fundamentals of the subject.

WordPress’s Loop Exists in the PHP Template Files

As we discussed in the last chapter, a theme is composed, first and foremost, of the PHP template files that make up the theme. For example, the WordPress template hierarchy dictates which web pages (and post bundles) should be associated with which template files: for a request that pulls a site’s “About” page, home.php for a request that pulls a site’s blog index page, and index.php as a universal fallback in the event that something higher up in the hierarchy isn’t triggered, for example. Once we’ve determined the template file we’re dealing with, it’s time to go into the file’s internals, which is where we’ll discover The Loop.

The Loop is What Processes Posts in WordPress

It’s called The Loop because you may provide formatting inside it, and WordPress will apply that formatting to every post in the fetched bundle—which is why it’s named The Loop. The WordPress Loop is the method through which WordPress handles any collection of articles that have been retrieved. Using The Loop, you can specify how each post in the fetched bundle should be presented to the user. WordPress will “loop through” the bundle and reuse the selected format for each and every post in the bundle, which is why it is referred to as The Loop in the first place.

However, if there is just one post on the webpage—for example, if someone requests a single blog post or the site’s “About” page—WordPress will still use the fundamental notion of The Loop to show the (single) article on the webpage, which is a feature of the WordPress framework.

WordPress’s Loop is the Customizable Heart of Template Files

Changing the contents of the Loop is the most common approach to make your template files operate in a different way. The Loop is the heart of each template file, and it’s highly adaptable; it differs from file to file in terms of functionality. Changing the contents of the Loop is the most common approach to make your template files operate in a different way. For example, you could wish to restrict the display of your blog index page (which is controlled by your theme’shome.php) to one-paragraph samples of your blog entries rather than the entire text of your blog posts.

(We discuss template tags later, inThe Magic ofthe ()andget the ()Post Template Tags —they’re fantastic!) While at the same time, you’d like the websites for each of your individual blog articles (which are controlled by single.php) to display the whole contents of the article rather than simply an excerpt.

A large part of what WordPress theme development is all about is being able to control these variances across themes.

An Example of a WordPress Loop

Some template files are quite small, with the exception being The Loop. In the section below, you’ll find the single.php file for the popular Twenty Fifteen theme for WordPress. The loop is found on lines 15 to 43 of the text. The contents of The Loop itself will not be revealed for the time being (therefore lines 18 to 39 are hidden)—but take note that single.phpcontains little more than The Loop! To put it another way, The Loop is responsible for nearly all of the effort required to make this template file show its contents.

Let’s put Twenty Fifteen aside for a while and speak about the overall structure of a Loop in anytheme instead.

The Minimal Version of The Loop

We’ll take a look at the bare-bones PHP code that powers The Loop in this section. This code may be expressed in two different ways, and both of them accomplish the same task. Either: ?php /* Environment: We’re inside a theme template file in the WordPress template hierarchy */if (have posts()) while (have posts()) the post();/ (Loop contents will go here) / end while / end ifOr.?php /* Environment: We’re inside a theme template file in the WordPress template hierarchy */if (have posts()) while (have posts()) the post();/ (Loop Our current location is within a theme template file within the WordPress template hierarchy */if (have posts()): the post(); while (have posts()): the post(); (Loop contents will go here) endwhile; endif; endif; Avoid getting too hung up on the fact that there are two methods to write The Loop; they’re simply two different ways of “punctuating” PHP, and they both signify the same thing in the end.

We like the second way of writing it, so we’ll continue to use it for the rest of the chapter as a guideline.

How The Loop Works in WordPress

In the programming sense, the Loop is exactly what it says it is: a loop. For the second Loop example shown above, we’ll go through each line in detail in this portion of the tutorial: (the one with theendwhilein it). The first thing to note is that The Loop is, in fact, a loop in the traditional programming definition of the term. For the uninitiated, ititerates(loops) over a collection of WordPress posts—and continues to do so until the set of posts is exhausted. Here’s how it works, line by line, how it works:

if (have_posts()):

The Loop initially inquires of the larger WordPress environment, “Have any posts been retrieved for me to process?” before moving on to the next question. A WordPress function named have posts is used to ask this question (). Depending on whether there are posts to process, or if there aren’t, that functionreturns (provides) either true or false. If the response we get back fromhave posts()istrues, then everything is included within theif -statement—which is The Loop itself—will be activated and perform its function.

while (have_posts()):

Having gone through the initialif -statement, we now know that we do, in fact, have posts to cycle through. As a result, here is the line when The Loop’s actualloop begins. The loop is called a PHPwhileloop because it continues to iterate as long as (or while) a condition is met. To put it another way, this line reads “While there are still postings to process:” In other words, while there are still posts to act on, this loop will run the code contained within it once for each post. In the event that there are no more postings, The Loop will come to an end, and the page will move on to the next item in this PHP template.

the_post();

Keep in mind that we are currently within thewhileloop that was explained previously. “Since we’ve got a post to work on, let’s start by queueing up the current post,” says the author of this sentence. “Queuing up” a post object is accomplished by the post(), which effectively sets up the next retrieved post object to be worked on by the WordPress processes that are available to us within The Loop. This function is required by the Loop, but we don’t need to know anything about it other than what we’ve already learned.

// (Post content will go here)

This section contains the bulk of the information in The Loop. It’s here that we’ll be able to express ourselves creatively—here is where we’ll really write code to interact with each fetched post, one by one. Because it is the part that we will create ourselves, it is now empty save for a PHP comment that serves as a placeholder. We’ll go over this part in greater detail later in this chapter.

endwhile;

This is PHP’s way of expressing, “We’ve completed the whileloop in which we were previously trapped.” Anything that occurs between the while (): and the end while; tags is considered to be inside the loop; anything that occurs after is considered to be outside the loop and will only be executed once the whileloop has completed.

endif;

A means of stating, “We’ve finished with theif -statement we were in,” is PHP’s way of saying. When the conditional statement is true, everything betweenif ():andendif;is executed; however, anything following it is not impacted by the conditional statement itself.

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An Example of a Loop in Action

We’ve now learned the fundamental “skeleton” grammar of The Loop; let’s look at an example of a very simple Loop that really accomplishes something: ?php/* Environment: Within a theme template file in the WordPress template hierarchy */if (have posts()): We’re within a theme template file. while (have posts()) is active: the post(); h2?php?article class=”full-article” php?article endwhile; endif; the title();?/h2?php the excerpt();?/article?php the excerpt();?/article?php endwhile; endif;

What This Loop Outputs for WordPress Themes

This Loop first produces an HTMLarticletag for each post in the bundle, and then loops through them all. Within that, it displays first the title of the current post, followed by a brief excerpt—by default, the first 55 words of the post, followed by—of the current post. So, using some posts from the blog of our website Press Up as samples, the Loop above produces the following output: full-article class=”full-article” description=” h2 In order to determine what your Minimum Viable Product should be measuring /h2p In our last post, we introduced you to the concept of the Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and discussed some of the internal issues that might occur when you are preparing to share a beta version of your idea with others.

  1. When you create an MVP, you aren’t just launching a fast and inexpensive version of your product because it’s convenient.
  2. The outcome may be excellent; nevertheless, as many entrepreneurs have discovered, it is far too easy to speed through or completely neglect the process of refining our early ideas into something that people genuinely desire.
  3. A disproportionate number of online initiatives fail to achieve their objectives.
  4. The issue is that /p/article/ is a placeholder for /p/article/ (And so on for many more articles)

Patterns to Notice about The Loop

Initially, this Loop produces an HTMLarticletag for each individual post in the bundle. Within that, it displays first the title of the current post, followed by a brief excerpt—by default, the first 55 words of the post, followed by—of the post in question. To illustrate, the Loop above produces the following posts from the blog of our site Press Up: The article has the class=”full-article” designation. h2 This is what your Minimum Viable Product (MVP) should be measuring/h2p After introducing you to the concept of the Minimum Viable Product (MVP), we went over some of the internal issues that might occur when you are preparing to share a beta version of your idea with others.

In the on/p/articlearticle> section, the class=”full-article” attribute is used to indicate that the article is a full-length piece of writing.

However, as many entrepreneurs have discovered, it is far too easy to speed through, or even completely neglect, the process of refining our early ideas into something that people actually want to purchase.

The Secrets to Planning a Successful Web Project/h2 How to Plan a Successful Web Project If you think about a web project in terms of technology rather than solutions, it’s far too simple to become bogged down in details.

Alternatively, the project may be the incorrect solution for the correct aim, the correct answer for the incorrect objective, or even the worst case scenario, a brilliant solution for no goal. Here’s the rub: Particles are available at (And so on for many more articles)

  1. Consider the way we alternate between simple HTML and PHP. Remember that anything that is not contained within?php?is pure HTML: in our instance, this includes theh2 and articletags. The real meat here—and this is where we get into the inner workings of WordPress—are the two PHPtemplate tagswe’re using:the title(), which, when used inside The Loop, prints out the current post’s title
  2. Andthe excerpt(), which prints out the first few lines of the current post’s content
  3. Andthe excerpt(), which prints out the first few lines of the current post’s content. We go into great depth about template tags in The Magic of the ()andget the ()Post Template Tags.

It would work if you created a theme with only one template hierarchy file, index.php, and inserted the above Loop into that index.php file. For example, the title and excerpt of each of your most recent Posts would be displayed on your site’s homepage, the title and snippet of each Page’s content would be displayed on your site’s “About” page, and so on.

You’re Now WordPress-Loop-Literate

We hope that this description of The Loop has helped to clarify its fundamental ideas. The Loops in most actual themes will be more complicated—but this is a great place to start. In The Magic of the_() and get the ()Post Template Tags, you’ll learn more about how to program the inner workings of The Loop using template tags like as the content() and get the_(). For the time being, though, you are Loop-literate, which is a wonderful thing! This is one of the most crucial aspects of developing a WordPress theme from the ground up.

Summary Limerick

The Loop is a loop that continues to run as long as there are still unfinished postings in the pile. In order to create the HTML file, each post and its sequels are marked-up as equals.

Quiz Time!

  1. WordPress template hierarchy files such as single.php and page.php
  2. Functions.php
  3. “always-used” WordPress templates such as header.php and footer.php
  4. And functions.php
  1. Once per fetched post
  2. Once per post in the database
  3. Once every post in the database

Answers and Explanations

  1. A.The Loop should always be present in the files that make up the WordPress template hierarchy
  2. Other theme files, on the other hand, do not. In a standard form of The Loop, the logic of A.Nofor() is employed
  3. B.The Loopwhile iterates over each post that has been retrieved in order to construct the current page, rather than iterating through each post in the whole database. That would be insane: a WordPress site can have hundreds or even thousands of posts stored in its database, and constructing a page frequently needs retrieving only one of those articles, or a small number of them.

in a standard template file how often does the wordpress loop run

WordPress loops over the first two postsdiv class=”col-lg-12″div class=”row” php?php If (have posts()) is true, then?php while(have posts()): /* Begin the Featured Loop */?php if (in category(‘Featured’)): /* Begin the Featured Loop */?php if (in category(‘Featured’)): /* Begin the Featured Loop */?php if (in category(‘Featured’)): /* Begin the Featured Loop */?php the post();?php $wp query- current post = 0; / if ($wp query- current post = 0) Open wide column wrapper div/?php /?php /?php /?php?php the conditional statement if($wp query- current post=1) get template part(‘content’, ‘featured’); /insert huge post/?php if($wp query- current post = 1 ||

  1. $wp query- current post = 1 ||
  2. $wp query- current post = 1 ||
  3. $wp query- current post = $wp query- current post = $wp query- post count-1) $wp query- post count-1) /close wide column div/?php /close wide column div/?php if ($wp query- current post = 2 ||
  4. $wp query- current post = 1 ||
  5. $wp query- current post = 1 ||
  6. $wp query- current post = 1 ||

$wp query- current post = 5) get template part(‘content’, ‘featuredside’); /insert small post/?php if($wp query- current post = 5) get template part $wp query- post count-1) $wp query- post count-1) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

What is a Loop in WordPress?

The loop, often known as the WordPress loop or just the loop, is a piece of PHP code that shows posts from the WordPress blog. When creating a list of posts in a web page, WordPress themes make use of the loop to show the list. There are various functions within the loop that are executed by default in order to show postings. The output may be formatted by theme developers by utilizing template tags to change how each post inside the loop is presented on the website. It is possible to format, organise, and publish post data using theTemplate tags, which are only available to WordPress users when they are inside the loop.

One of the most significant components of the WordPress code, and one that is at the heart of nearly all inquiries in one form or another, is the WordPress loop (or fork).

Understanding the WordPress Loop – Infographic

For those who are new to WordPress, we’ve produced an infographic that breaks out the WordPress Loop. An example of how to use a simple WordPress loop is as follows: ?php/ determines whether there are any posts that correspond to the query if (have posts()): / If there are any posts that match the query, then start the loop while (have posts()) is true: the post();/ the code in between the while loops will be repeated for each post in the series. ? h2 id=””> “post-?php the ID();? “a href=”?php the permalink();?

() ?

“?php the title();?php the title();?php the title();?php the title();?php the title();?php the title();?php the title();?php the title(); ?/a/h2p class= “date-author” When was this post made:?php the date(); By calling the author() in PHP, we can say that If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected] or [phone number].

This entry was tagged under:?php the tags();?|a href=”?php comments link();?” Comment on this article” title=”Leave a comment” The loop is terminated when all of the posts have been displayedendwhile;/ If no posts have been found, the loop is terminated;/ Otherwise, the loop is terminated.

/p?php endif;?

Additional Reading

  • Theme
  • How to Display Any Number of Posts in a WordPress Loop
  • How to Create a WordPress Loop
  • Template Tag
  • Template
  • How to Exclude the Most Recent Post From the WordPress Post Loop
  • Template Tag

The Editorial Staff at WPBeginner is a group of WordPress specialists, lead by Syed Balkhi, who provides guidance and support. Over 1.3 million readers around the world put their trust in us.

WordPress Loop: Everything You Need to Know!

Within the WordPress community, the code that shows blog articles on your WordPress theme is commonly referred to as the WordPress Loop, and it is referred to as The Loop in the WordPress Codex. Generally speaking, the Loop is regarded as the most crucial component of the WordPress theme. It is in charge of displaying blog entries on the current page based on the parameters sent into the script. As we progress through this article, we will go through the fundamentals of the WordPress Loop with examples to ensure that you have a clear grasp of what the code does, how to alter the code, and where the code can be located in your WordPress theme.

What Is WordPress Loop?

A loop, often known as a WordPress loop, is a section of PHP code that shows WordPress posts. In order to display the posts on the current web pages, WordPress themes make use of a loop. The loop is built on a set of functions that are meant to show the posts as a result of the execution of these functions. WordPress Loop is one of the most important elements of WordPress code, and it contains several Template Tags that are used to publish, format, and arrange post data. WordPress Loop is one of the most important elements of WordPress code, and it contains several Template Tags that are used to publish, format, and arrange post data.

  • Title (the title())
  • Time (the time())
  • Categories (the category())
  • Description (the description())

The Logic of WordPress Loop

To get started with the reasoning, let’s have a look at the basic code for the loop that we used before. Then we may go through each line one by one to make sure we comprehend what is being said. /Check If there are any posts, and if there are, then run the while loop?php. If (have posts()) is true: while (have posts()): the post();?/Display Posts code hereh2?php;?/Display Posts code The title of the post will be shown using the title();?/h2/Display the title of the post?php The post thumbnail, often known as the featured picture, is shown using the post thumbnail();?php php endwhile; the excerpt();?/Display an extract from the post?php otherwise:?/Complete the while loopp?php _e(‘No Posts To Display.’);?/p?php endif;?/end loopp?php _e(‘No Posts To Display.’);?/p?php endif;?/end loopp?php _e(‘No Posts To Display.’);?/end loopp?php _e(‘No Posts To Display.’);?/end loopp?php _e(‘No Posts To If condition is met In the Loop, we have one “if” statement and one “while” loop to complete the process.

  1. It is checked whether or not there are any posts available to be displayed using the “if” statement; the “have posts” WordPress function returns true or false depending on whether or not there are any posts available to be displayed.
  2. In addition to the “while” loop, the “have posts” WordPress function is included.
  3. The code then moves on to the WordPress function “the post” to complete the task.
  4. Following is an example from the previous section: the title -displays the title of the post The post thumbnail retrieves the featured image of the blog post.

The excerpt retrieves the extract of the blog post. the post thumbnail – retrieves the featured image of the blog post. Certainly, there are more methods that we can use to extract items from posts, and we will go over a number of them in this section.

Hyperlinking on Post Title

You’ve undoubtedly noticed that blog post titles include hyperlinks to the actual content themselves. The link takes you to a single page view of the blog article once you click on it, which is convenient. A file named single.php is included in most themes, and it is called when you are viewing a single post. In order to link the two functions, we will utilize the “the permalink” WordPress function and encapsulate the “the title” function within it. Example: If (have posts()) is true, the following code is executed: while (have posts()) is active: the post();?h2a href=”?php the permalink();?

Displaying the Content, Author, Date, and Category Using the Loop

You may have come across several blogs that feature postings that include the author’s name, the whole text of the main blog page, as well as the date and category of the post. You can quickly and simply display all of these essential facts within the loop by utilizing the methods listed below: the content — This function displays the whole blog content. then author — This function displays the author’s name. the time — This function displays the current time and date. the category — Displays the category in which the post is located.

  1. loopp?php _e(‘No Posts To Display.’);?/p?php endif;?
  2. For example, the function “is home” determines if the current view is that of the home page or not (main page of the blog).
  3. Suppose we put our Loop between a “if” condition that determines if the current page is the main page.
  4. is home()?php if (is home())/ If the current page is the main/home page, this function returns true.
  5. The following are some of the most commonly used Conditional tags: is admin() — This function returns true if the site’s administrator has logged in.
  6. is page() — This function returns true on certain pages, for example, is page(‘about-us’).
  7. is author() – This function checks for the presence of an author and returns true.

for example, is author(‘ahsan’) The function is 404(), which determines whether or not the page exists and may be used on 404 pages to perform a customized Loop. has excerpt() – This function determines if a post has an excerpt.

5 Useful Loops in WordPress

Check out these five typical loops in WordPress to get you started.

1. Insert Ads After the First Post

If you need to insert advertisements after the initial post, here is a method of accomplishing this. If (have posts()) is true, the following code is executed: ?php $count is equal to zero; the post();?php while (have posts()) is true; ?php if ($count = 2): $count++;?php if ($count = 2): ?/ Fill up the blanks with your advertisement code. h2a href=”?php the permalink();? “?php the title();?/a”?php the excerpt();?php the excerpt();?php the excerpt();?php the excerpt();?php the excerpt();?php the excerpt();?php the excerpt();?php the excerpt();?php the_ ?php otherwise: ?h2a href=”?php the permalink();?

2. Fetch Posts Between Two Dates

One of the most often encountered scenarios is the need to retrieve postings from a specified time period. In order to do this, utilize the WordPress loop in the following manner. ?php filter where($where = ‘) is a function that finds matches where $when is equal to ‘ return $where; $where.= ” AND post date= ‘2009-03-17’ AND post date=’2009-05-03′”; return the value of $where; return the value of $where; If have posts() is true, then the post(), the content(), and endwhile are executed. If have posts() is false, then endwhile is executed.

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After that, the function filter where is connected up to the method post where().

3. List Upcoming Posts

A list of forthcoming posts is an excellent method to keep your blog readers engaged while they are on your site. This may be accomplished by use the following loop. ?php query posts(‘showposts=10 post status=future’);?php query posts(‘showposts=10 post status=future’); ?php If (have posts()) is true: while (have posts()) is active: the post();?h2?php the title(); /h2span class=”datetime”?php /h2span class=”datetime”?php /h2span class=”datetime”?php /h2span class=”datetime”?php /h2span class=”datetime”?php /h2span class=”datetime”?php endwhile the time(‘j.

Y’);?/span/p?php the time(‘j.

Y’);?/span/p?php else: ?p There are no upcoming events scheduled.

Post status is a function that is used in the code above to get posts based on the date that they were published.

4. Create An Archive Page

The archive page is a wonderful place to keep a collection of your most popular pieces from the past so that people may still locate them when they visit your blog in the future. Make sure to include a template page for displaying old entries on your website. ?php /* Template Name: Archives */?php /* Template Name: Archives */?php get header(); ?h2?php $numposts = the number of posts. $wpdb- get var is a function. (“SELECT COUNT(*) FROM $wpdb- posts WHERE post status = ‘publish'”); if (0$numposts) $numposts = number format($numposts); if (0$numposts) $numposts = number format($numposts); ?h2?php echo The number of recipes published since October 6, 2008 is $numposts.’ ?/h2ul id=”archive-list”>?/h2ul id=”archive-list”> ?php $myposts = get posts(‘numberposts=-1 ‘); foreach($myposts as $post): $myposts = get posts(‘numberposts=-1 ‘); ?li?php the time(‘m/d/y’)?:a href=”?php the permalink();?

“?php the permalink();?php the permalink();?php the permalink();?php the permalink();?php the permalink();?php the permalink();?php the permalink();?php the permalink();?php the title();?/a/li?php endforeach;?/ul?php get sidebar();?php get footer();?/ul?php get footer();?/ul?php get footer();?/ul?php get footer();?/ul?php get footer();?/ul?php get footer();?/ul?php get footer();?/ul?php get footer()

5. Create Image Loop

Displaying your blog entries in a gallery-like format is made easy with the picture loop feature of WordPress. Each post is represented with an image as well as an extract from it. Let’s take a look at how to accomplish this with WordPress Loops. function catch that image() is a global function. $post, $posts; $first img = ‘; ob start(); ob end clean(); ob start clean(); ob end clean(); ob start clean(); ob start clean(); ob start clean(); ob start clean(); ob start clean(); ob start clean(); ob start clean(); $output = preg match all(‘/ img.+src= (+), ‘/ img.+src= (+), ‘/ img.+src= (+), ‘/ img.+src= (+), ‘/ img.+src= (+), ‘/ img.+src= (+), ‘/ img.+src= (+), ‘/ img.+src= (+ The expression /i’, $post- post content, and $matches) is used in the following ways: $first img is equal to $matches; if(empty($first img)) /Constructs a default picture by setting $first img to “/images/default.jpg”; $first img should be returned; To make the pictures visible in a browser, provide the following code.

?php if (have posts()): while (have posts()): the post();?a href=”?php the permalink();?

” alt=”?php the title();?

” alt=”?php the title();?” /aendwhile; endif WordPresshave postsfunction is used to determine whether or not there is any data available for looping.

The Loop is the Future

As a driving engine for WordPress themes, you may think of the Loop as such. It is absolutely important to utilize it in order for posts to be shown. In this essay, I’ve covered the fundamentals of looping. There are several applications for looping, and I urge that you review the Loop in action. However, if the Loop is used in conjunction with a high-performing, fast WordPress hosting platform, it will function admirably. Cloudways is eager to take part in the Loop! Our testing have revealed that websites hosted on Cloudways load 100 percent quicker than those hosted on other servers.

Q. What is the WordPress Loop?

WordPress Loop is a mechanism for dynamically showing a list of data with given parameters on a WordPress website.

Q. Types of loops in WordPress?

It is possible to design a loop according to one’s own specifications using the pre-defined WordPress functions. There are numerous sorts of loops available.

Q. How to Display Any Number of Posts in a WordPress Loop?

In order to do this, you must restrict the amount of posts that are processed when performing the loop over WordPress posts.

Q. What Does Loop Display?

WordPress Loop may be used to display data and pictures on a web page using the WordPress editor. Please express your thoughts in the comment box. COMMENT RIGHT NOWCustomer Feedback at

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wordpress loop and template files

The index.php file specifies how to show a loop of blog articles. category.php accomplishes the same task, except it is only displayed when a category archive is displayed. While searching for the most particular template it can locate, WordPress will move backwards until it finds a file that already exists, with index.php being the most general of the templates it can find It will continue to operate properly as long as the template include the main loop. The type of post shown has nothing to do with the template that is being utilized.

It is query vars that are used to get the actual posts, whether they be category posts, single individual posts, pages, date archives, or any other type of post. This is done long before WordPress decides which template to use for the articles.

  • Your rewrite rules will execute some regex to extract some data from the URL
  • This is what you want. These pieces of information are then sanitized and utilized as query variables (the specifics of which can be seen on the codex WP Query page)
  • A number of tests are performed based on these query variables, and internal values, such as ‘is main loop’ and ‘is search,’ among others, are filled in. Now that the query variables have been completed, we have everything we need to run the main loop, which has been created and is ready to use
  • The template loader is now activated as a result of the tests performed previously. It refers to the primary query object and is organized in accordance with the template hierarchy. The template that was judged to be the most’specific’ is loaded. If this template has correctly implemented the main loop (as it should), the posts that were previously loaded are now visible. If the most particular template cannot be discovered, the process moves on to the next most specific, and so on until it reaches the most ‘generic’ template, which is index.php, which is the default. The index.php file is essential for a theme to function, thus it will always be available.

There is no difference between loading index.php and loading category.php or archive.php, or any other file for that matter. So what is the purpose of category.php? Even though we simply require index.php, it’s possible that we’d like our category archives to appear different from our main listing. Perhaps we want the site to appear different for listings than it does for individual entries. Instead of having a large number of if else statements in index.php, such as if listing do this, else if category listing do that, etc., WordPress makes use of the template heirarchy structure.

They are only for the sake of display and have nothing to do with the data itself or the source of the data.

You decide to recruit a new designer as well as a carpenter one day.

You see that once you hand over these drawings to the new carpenter, he begins to construct round tables.

How To Override the Default WordPress Loop

An example of a WordPress Loop, or “The Loop,” as many refer to it, is a feature in WordPress that is used to show each of your posts in reverse chronological order. For the most part, you may control the amount of articles that are displayed by editing the “Reading” tab in your WordPress Admin Panel’s Settings area. What can you do, on the other hand, to override the default WordPress Loop?

How to Use the Loop

When utilizing the Loop, it should be included in your theme’s index.php file, as well as any additional templates that are used to show the information about your website’s posts on your website. The purpose of this tutorial is to demonstrate to you numerous instances of how to utilize The Loop and override it in order to display articles in a variety of different ways. Simply follow the code samples provided below to get the WordPress Loop override structure of your choice. If you wish to make any of the changes listed below, you will need to access the functions.php file, which is found in the WordPress administration dashboard.

Once you’ve opened and prepared the file, you may begin adding the demo code functions that are presented below.

Display Any Number of Posts

The WordPress Loop example will display whatever amount of posts that are included within that specific WordPress Loop instance. To add the posts, open any template file where you would like them to appear and include the following loop: / If everything is in order and ready to go, let’s get the loop going. ?php If (have posts()) is true: while (have posts()) is active: the post(); ?/ In order to display an arbitrary number of posts, we must repeat the loop an arbitrary amount of times. Consequently, we establish a numerical variable named ‘$count,’ and initialize it to zero/ with each iteration of the loop, ‘$count’ will rise by one/ after the value of ‘$count’ has reached the desired number, the loop will terminate.

?php static $count = 0;if ($count = “n”);if ($count = “n”); else When we wrap the post content in a div for CSS styling and layout purposes, we are displaying the complete post content.

/ In order to show post excerpts instead of whole posts, update the code to ‘?php the excerpt();?

div class=”post”?php div class=”post” the title();?

the content();?/div/ Continue with the restriction of the number of posts displayed here/ each iteration of the loop increases the value of ‘$count’ by one/ the final two lines finish off the loop and close the if condition?php $count++;?php endwhile;?php endif;?php endif;?php endif;?php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php endif;php end

Exclude Posts From Some Category

Example of how to prevent a certain Category or Categories from being displayed in a loop is demonstrated below: ?php $query = new WP Query(‘cat=-3,-8’); $query = new WP Query(‘cat=-3,-8’); ?php is a php script that allows you to create a website. $query- the post() if ($query- have posts()) and $query- the post() if ($query- have posts()); ?div class=”post”!?div class=”post”! – Display the title as a link to the post’s URL in the body of the post. –h2a href=”?php the permalink()? ” rel=”bookmark” title=”Permanent Link to?php the title attribute();?

” rel=”bookmark” title=”Permanent Link to?php the title attribute();?

– Display the date (in the format of November 16th, 2009) and a link to additional articles written by the author of this post.

If this is not the case, the first div box is closed.

Style Posts From Some Category Differently

Using this loop example, each post is displayed along with its Title (which serves as a link to the Post’s Permalink), Categories, and Content. Additionally, it allows articles in a category with Category ID ‘3’ to be formatted in a different way:! – Begin the looping process. –?php (Hypertext Preprocessor) If (have posts()) is true: if (have posts()): the post();?! – Determine if the current post is in category 3. –!– If this is the case, the div box is assigned the CSS class “post-cat-three.” –, – If this is not the case, the div box is assigned the CSS class “post.” If (in category(‘3’)) is true, then: –?php ?div class=”post-cat-three” width=”600″ height=”600″ ?php if not: ?div class=”post”>?div class=”post”>?div class=”post”> What is?php endif;?!

  1. – Display the title as a link to the post’s URL in the body of the post.
  2. ” rel=”bookmark”>?
  3. “?php the title();?/a/h2!
  4. “?php the title();?/a/h2!
  5. –small?php the time(‘F jS, Y’);?by?php the time(‘F jS, Y’);?by?php the author posts link();?/small!
  6. –div class=”entry”?php the content();?/div!
  7. – Display a comma-separated list of the categories associated with the Post.
  8. – Terminate the loop (but take note of the “else:” – see the following line.) else:?!
  9. – The very first “if” checked to see if there were any Posts to –!– show before proceeding forward.

If there aren’t any, this “otherwise” section explains what to do. –p?php esc html e esc html e (‘Sorry, no posts met your search criteria.’);?/p!– Please, please, please, halt The Loop. –?php endif;? –?php endif;?

Nested Loops

Nested Loops are merely a way of saying that you are attempting to complete a second loop before completing the first. When used in particular conditions, this may be really beneficial. For example, you could wish to use a shortcode to display a list of recent posts. $my query = new WP Query(‘cat=3’);if ($my query- have posts()) while ($my query- have posts()) $my query- the post();the content();wp reset postdata();wp reset postdata();wp reset postdata();wp reset postdata();wp reset postdata();wp_ It’s important to remember that after a nested loop, you want to reset the main loop data.

Accessing thefunctions.phpFile

Having knowledge of how to access the functions.php file on your WordPress website is required before you can add any of the code above to experiment with the default WordPress loop or any other code you may want to attempt on your WordPress website. This may be accomplished by logging into your cPanel and selecting the appropriate file. The most convenient method, however, is to access the file straight from the WordPress administration panel. Here’s how to go about it, as well as how to input the code from above if you’re just testing it out.

Step 1: Go to Theme Editor

From the WordPress site’s administration panel, choose AppearanceTheme Editor from the drop-down menu. If you look at the dashboard’s left-hand menu section, you’ll notice this option. This link will take you to all of the primary site files on your computer.

Step 2: Click on the Theme Functions File

Immediately to the right of the screen, you’ll see that there are numerous file selections accessible. The amount of options accessible will be determined on the operating system you are presently using. Locate the “Theme Functionfunctions.phpfile” and double-click on it to bring up the file’s details and instructions.

Step 3: Scroll to the Bottom of the File

Now that the file has been opened, you may modify it by inserting the necessary code. Scroll all the way down to the very bottom of the file and make any necessary code modifications. Keep in mind to update your file whenever you make code modifications. When the update is completed successfully, proceed to verify that the code was successful. You may repeat these steps as many times as necessary to include as much important code in that file as you like for different functions.

Final Thoughts

Hope this post provided you with some simple examples of how you may modify the default WordPress loop in a variety of different ways in a short amount of time. As you can see from the code above, there are a variety of possibilities to experiment with. Make no changes to the functions.php file or add or remove code unless you are confident in your comprehension of how everything works and how to fix it if something goes wrong. As of the time of this writing, we have not been able to locate a plugin that performs this.

Please let us know if you come across one. Is it possible that the code above was incorrectly written? Do you understand how to quickly and easily reach the correctfunctions.phpfile in order to utilize the code in the previous section?

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